Category Archives: Double Peak School

Important Boundary and Budgetary issues facing San Marcos Unified School District (SMUSD)

Important Boundary and Budgetary Issues Facing San Marcos Unified School District (SMUSD)
Attendance Boundaries potentially being redrawn and District Budget Deficit, the district website has the following topics with information links that are important and public information. Please participate and share in the discussion here and on social media as this important issue that may potentially impact San Elijo Hills and San Marcos.
District Budget Deficit

Among the most important responsibilities of the Governing Board and Superintendent is to ensure the financial health of our district, and to inform the community when changes in district finances might meaningfully impact the educational services San Marcos Unified School District (SMUSD) provides. That is the purpose of this letter.

Due to flattening state revenues, and dramatic increases in mandated costs, we are forecasting very difficult financial days ahead here at SMUSD, which we more fully explain below. As we enter these difficult financial times, we want you to be aware of our predicament, the circumstances that brought us here, and our path forward.

Attendance Boundary Committee

“San Marcos Unified’s new Attendance Boundary Committee will meet for the first time next week to begin their work on recommendations for the Governing Board’s consideration.  As meetings continue, you will find more information HERE regarding the progress of the committee. We anticipate the committee’s recommendations to go before the Governing Board in the early part of 2018, which they will then review and approve all or part of the recommendations.  Our community will have an opportunity to comment publicly prior to the Board taking action.”

 

How San Marcos Unified Deals With a Rare and Welcome Problem: Booming Enrollment – Voice of San Diego

How San Marcos Unified Deals With a Rare and Welcome Problem: Booming EnrollmentMost school districts in San Diego County – and throughout the state – struggle with declining enrollment. But the city of San Marcos’ population has more than doubled since 1990, and that’s meant lots of new students for San Marcos Unified, which has to constantly find space for its growing student body.

READ MORE VIA Source: How San Marcos Unified Deals With a Rare and Welcome Problem: Booming Enrollment – Voice of San Diego

San Marcos goes back to school -Traffic delays expected during daily commute

Traffic delays expected during daily commute

As the summer winds down, San Marcos students are headed back to school. With elementary, middle and high schools along with California State San Marcos and Palomar College back in session this week, I-15 and SR-78 travelers can expect increased traffic delays during their daily commute.

While the increase in traffic congestion is familiar to city residents, students and commuters alike, the City of San Marcos is pleased to report that continued relief is on the way. In the city’s ongoing efforts to get motorists moving and improve traffic flow, several roadway improvement projects are lined up over the next five years.

Planned projects include Improvements to the intersection of Las Posas Road and Mission Road near Palomar College and the transit center; Construction of two new bridges to replace Bent Avenue and Via Vera Cruz between San Marcos Boulevard and Discovery Street; San Marcos Boulevard and Discovery Street intersection improvements; and construction of Twin Oaks Trail north of Borden Road.

During the school year and periods of roadway construction, motorists should drive with caution in and around work areas, and provide ample time to reach destinations safely and on time.

To learn more about capital improvement projects in San Marcos, visit www.san-marcos.net/cip.

2017 San Elijo Elementary & Double Peak Country Fair

Yee-haw! Dust off your boots because The Country Fair is coming and it going to be an amazing experience for the whole family!  Presented to you by San Elijo Elementary and Double Peak School, this is an event you will not want to miss!!  This much anticipated volunteer run event brings people from the community together to build camaraderie and create memories while raising money for education.

This year’s shindig will be held:

 Friday, May12th from 5pm – 8pm and Saturday, May 13th 11am – 5pm 

at the San Elijo Elementary School (SEES).

Friday Night festivities will include food, a live DJ  and plenty of fun while you seek thrills on your favorite carnival rides like the Zipper, Crazy Plane, Umbrella Cars, Cycle Jump, Alligator Alley and more.  Saturday will feature the all of the rides plus other fun activities including Pony Rides, Petting Zoo, games, prize walk,  and so much more!!!  

Do you have a business you would like to promote?? The Country Fair committee needs new ranchers (Sponsors) and ranch hands (volunteers for the committee) to help make their biggest fundraiser of the year a good ole-fashioned success.  If you would like more information on how to become a sponsor or volunteer; please contact TheCountryFair2017@gmail.com.

This is a PTO sponsored event and all proceeds go to support and supplement educational programs within San Elijo Elementary and Double Peak School.  Both schools are a 501c3 and all donations are tax deductible.

Public meeting announcement for new proposed project on Twin Oaks near South Lake.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC WORKSHOP

WHEN: WHERE: PROJECT:

Wednesday, April 19, 2017, 6:00 PM
City of San Marcos – Valley of Discovery Room, 1 Civic Center Drive, San Marcos, CA Brookfield Residential Properties “MU-4 Area” – P17-0015: Specific Plan 17-002, General Plan Amendment 17-002, Rezone 17-001, Tentative Subdivision Map 17-003, Multi-Family Site Development Plan 17-002, Grading Variance 17-003

This notice is to inform you of an upcoming public workshop for the proposed Brookfield Residential Properties MU-4 project. The proposed project includes a Specific Plan Amendment, General Plan Amendment, and Zone Change to modify the permitted land uses onsite from Heart of the City Specific Plan “Business Park” and Public Institutional (PI) to Heart of the City Specific Plan “Low Medium Density Residential” (8-12 dwelling units per acre); a Tentative Subdivision Map and Multi-Family Site Development Plan to construct 218 attached residential condominium units; and, a Grading Variance to allow for slopes in excess of 20 feet. The project site is located at the southwest corner of South Twin Oaks Valley Road and South Village Drive. The workshop is intended to provide to the public an overview of the proposed project by the developer and an opportunity to inquire and comment on the proposed project. For more information, please contact Art Piñon in the Planning Division at (760) 744-1050, extension 3234, or email at apinon@san-marcos.net, or visit the Development Services counter during the week between 7:30 am and 5:30 pm. Note: We are closed every other Friday.

Dear San Marcos Candidates

Letter to the editor-

Dear San Marcos Candidates,

As a mother of three children, all attending the three most impacted schools in the San Marcos Unified School District, I would like to ask how you would help alleviate the impacted schools and align the city’s growth plan with the school districts size. I was a parent representative on the 2013 attendance boundary committee for San Elijo Elementary.  As a member of the committee, I saw the need of alleviating the impacted schools of Discovery, San Elijo Elementary, and San Elijo Middle was critical.  The boundaries were realigned in an attempt to best address the impacted schools and a recommendation was made in favor of creating a K-8 school. This recommendation did not address the even larger concern, where do all of the elementary and middle school students attend for high school if those multiple schools are at capacity? How do you feed twelve elementary schools with average student populations of 1,000 into four middle schools, and ultimately  into two high school? What happens when more development occurs? I posed the question then to the committee of what  was the capacity of both Mission Hills High School and San Marcos High school.  I was told 2800 and 3200 respectively after additional buildings and portables added.  Surely, creating one K-8 school does not fully address the underlying problem of rapid city development and growth resulting in a larger student population impacting all  school grades. My children attend San Elijo Elementary,  San Elijo Middle,  and San Marcos High each school has the largest student population of their respective grade level school populations. San Elijo Elementary has 1,100 students in attendance,  granted this has decreased significantly by the opening of Double Peak for the 2016-2017 school year. San Elijo Middle has a student population of over 1,900 and is the largest middle school  in the district, whose attendance area includes Carlsbad and San Marcos. San Marcos High school has a student population of 3,200 which is at capacity according to the 2012-2013 attendance boundary committee projection. What happens with the influx of future students that will come with the completed development of the former quarry area, the college, and creek side development.  Where will those students from elementary through high school attend? The San Marcos Unified School district does NOT own any land for future school development. This  was an  issue in the acquiring land and developing Double Peak K -8. San Marcos High school is at its projected capacity and Mission Hills has a student population of 2600 of the 2800 capacity. In addition to the development in San Elijo Hills/Discovery/CSUSM area there has been the addition of multi unit family homes along Norhdal, Mission Rd, and Twin Oaks north of the 78. Those areas are just in City of San Marcos. The San Marcos Unified School District is comprised of  portions of Carlsbad, Escondido, San Marcos, Vista, and Unicorporated County areas. That means five seperate areas within the district  have their own city growth design, development, and approval process. I understand all those cities and unicorporated  areas within the district boundary pay taxes to the school district. How do you align reasonable and responsible school growth size when another city or San Marcos itself approves 20, 100, 400 homes for development?

What will your role be in creating a responsible balance between city growth and development as well as maintain an excellent school district and not create overcrowed underfunded schools?

Sincerely,
Alexis Barbuto
Voter and Mother of 3 students in San Marcos Unified School District

*** Editors Note-We welcome letters to the editor and political statements from San Marcos Candidates -San Elijo Life

____________________________

Dear Candidates,

I am responding to your inquiry with regards to the  piece I wrote and was posted on San Elijo Life Facebook. As stated within my letter, I am interested in how you will be able to align the City Council and the School District to provide balanced development and adequate schools for the growing student population in San Marcos. This seems to be a difficult task when all of the North County School Districts are comprised of multiple cities and unincorporated areas that are not solely within the city itself as implied by the name of the school district. Another example beyond San Marcos Unified’s composition, residents in Carlsbad  could live in an area in that city where their children attend either Encinitas Union/San Dieguito Unified for middle and high school, Carlsbad Unified or Oceanside Unified. How will north county cities which are all under rapid development create smart growth to support their school districts, when the school districts themselves were drawn including multiple cities? How can one city tell another to stop developing homes because it will affect another’s school district? Can San Marcos City Council really demand Carlsbad or Escondido to not approve more housing developments because the San Marcos Unified School District does not have land to build another school or currently the schools are overcrowded? The problem is multifaceted the school district boundaries drawn years ago, included multiple municipalities under one educational district roof.

Cities, NOT school districts approve and design development plans.

In addition to the fact the district itself does not own real estate for future development. The city approves plans without looking into whether or not the school district can support more students in certain areas.  Where would a new middle school or high school be developed in the high population density and development areas that drastically need another campus to alleviate the problem? Those areas don’t have land to purchase and build another school or are slated for more homes and businesses. The district is then forced to find a parcel to purchase large enough to sustain a school and traffic needs, but must maintain that school.  Will the San Marcos City Council rezone areas or transfer city owned land to the school district to accommodate land acquisition? What happens when a campus needs to be built within another city in the district to meet the demands of a growing student population such as Escondido or Carlsbad? How will the San Marcos Unified School District be able to support not only purchasing land, developing a school, and maintaining another school both infrastructure costs and administration when the San Marcos City council or any other municipality in the district approves more home development? This isn’t just a build more schools to match the development problem. How can a district support these schools caused by the excessive development

approved solely by the cities that reside in the district? Where will the San Marcos Unified School District obtain revenue to support the educational demands due to the increased student population? Do we just pay more taxes to stop gap the imbalance and shortsighted rapid development without looking into sustainable growth and support for our district? This is obviously a big picture problem that affects the overall quality of life in San Marcos and needs to be addressed.

What will your role be to align two very separate structured government entities for smart growth and educational excellence? Where will the balance be sustained so that development approval supports the schools to enhance the city? What rules and regulations will you seek to reform to support this vision?

Sincerely,
Alexis Barbuto
Voter and Mother of 3 students in the San Marcos Unified School District

Double Peak Challenge this Saturday

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On Saturday, Oct. 1, the City of San Marcos will welcome its first signature 10K event—the Double Peak Challenge. Featuring a 10K timed race, a 2K untimed event and a free kids trail trot starting from San Elijo Hills Park, 1105 Elfin Forest Road, all participants must register online at www.doublepeakchallenge.com or in-person on race day at 6:30 am.

“Double Peak Challenge is a trail run like no other,” said Friends of San Marcos Parks and Recreation Board Member Nick Buck. “The race is a celebration of outdoor recreation where trail runners will experience unparalleled beauty atop of North County’s highest point.”

With festivities kicking off at 7 am, runners can participate in a pre-race cardio stretch and warm-up.

Off-road racers participating in the 10K Double Peak Challenge will set out at 7:30 am to begin a nearly 2,000-foot elevation gain up to Double Peak’s summit while winding along rugged hillside trails with sweeping views of North County, San Diego.

While the 10K race will be a tough timed event that will challenge even the most experienced runners, Double Peak Challenge will also offer a shorter 2K untimed course at 8 am and a free kids trail trot at 9:30 am. All registered 10K and 2K participants will receive a custom commemorative Double Peak Challenge completion medal and awards will be given to the top 10K race finishers in each age category.

An event expo and beer garden will be located in the lower softball fields at San Elijo Hills Park. 10K race participants over 21 years of age with proof of ID will receive a complimentary beer in the beer garden. Additional beverages can be purchased for $5 each.

All race proceeds will benefit the Friends of San Marcos Parks & Recreation and The San Marcos Promise.

“Participation in the Double Peak Challenge supports two great causes integral to the city of San Marcos,” said The San Marcos Promise Executive Director Herbie Smith.  “Your commitment to #ReachthePeak promotes health and economic prosperity for our entire region through investment in local parks and higher education.”

The Friends of San Marcos Park & Recreation invests in events, programs, parks and facilities to enhance the quality of life in the City of San Marcos.

The San Marcos Promise provides students in the San Marcos Unified School District with a path to prosperity by providing scholarships and career guidance to inspire academic achievement and post-secondary educational opportunities.

Other event sponsors include the City of San Marcos, San Marcos Unified School District, San Elijo Hills, Lusardi Construction Company, Rancho Tesoro, Stone Brewing Company, and Lounsbery, Ferguson, Altona and Peak, LLP.

To register for a race or to volunteer during the event, visit www.doublepeakchallenge.com. Corporate sponsorship packages are also available.

Double Peak School in San Marcos focuses on innovation, and includes a “maker space.” | SanDiegoUnionTribune.com

Students from kindergarten through middle school will try their hands at engineering, design and coding at Double Peak School in San Marcos, which opened its doors Monday. The school, open to students in kindergarten through eighth grade, sits off San Elijo Road, with expansive views of the hills on either side. With a focus on innovation, it features a “maker space,” where students can practice conceiving and constructing inventions, and an innovation lab, where they will learn apps, programs and other technological tools.

Read More Via Source: Double Peak School in San Marcos focuses on innovation, and includes a “maker space.” | SanDiegoUnionTribune.com

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