Tag Archives: election 2018

Mapping The Vote: Nov. 6, 2018, Elections. See how San Elijo Hills and voted on supervisor


Mapping The Vote: Nov. 6, 2018, Elections. See how San Elijo Hills and voted on supervisor and 50th congressional districting and prop 6.

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Unofficial Election Night Final Results for City of San Marcos Election

 

City of San Marcos Election Results are in. Rebecca Jones elected Mayor and Randy Walton elected to District 2 City Council Seat.

County of San Diego
Date:11/07/18
Time:10:47:27
Gubernatorial General Election
November 6, 2018
Unofficial Election Night Final
(Outstanding Ballots to be Processed: 490,000)

When to expect 2018 election results

When to expect 2018 election results

According to San Diego County, election results are expected to take longer than usual

Post Date:11/06/2018 9:00 AM

On election night, we all want to know who won and which propositions and measures passed – and as soon as possible! According to the County of San Diego, the Nov. 6 Gubernatorial General Election results are expected to take longer than usual to come in. Here’s why.

  • San Diego County voters will get a two-card ballot with contests listed both on the front and back. Voters will need more time to fill them out and the Registrar of Voters will need more time to process them.
  • More mail ballots than ever before were issued by the Registrar’s office, over 1.2 million, and many voters do not turn them in until Election Day.
  • A record high number of registered voters: San Diego County has more than 1.7 million registered voters.
  • More polling places will be open: 1,542, up from 1,444 in the June 5 Primary Election.

In short, we have two cards for every ballot, more candidates, more measures, more voters, more polling places, more mail ballots and more ballot cards in general.

The number of provisional ballots cast has grown in recent elections. These take additional processing time. Registrar workers must make sure your votes count for the contests you were entitled to vote on and that they don’t count the ones you weren’t.

Mail ballots are more convenient, but if you drop them off at the polls on Election Day, the Registrar of Voters can’t start counting them until Thursday at the earliest because the signatures need to be verified first. The Registrar expects 250,000 to 300,000 mail ballots will be dropped off at the polls or picked up at the U.S. Postal Service on Nov. 6.

“This is not really a new phenomenon,” said Vu. “We’re just likely to have a higher volume of outstanding ballots.”

So what can you expect?

The polls close at 8 p.m. Within minutes, the results should come through for the ballots that were mailed in, submitted at drop-off points before Election Day or during early voting at the Registrar’s office.

After that, some precinct results may trickle in, but only a very light number. Close to 11 p.m. you can expect the bulk of the precinct numbers. Then, results should come in periodically as trucks with ballot boxes continue to roll in. All the precinct ballots might not arrive until after 1 a.m. and the final unofficial election night results may not be done until after 4 a.m.

After all the precinct ballots are counted on election night, Vu expects only about 55 to 60 percent of the vote to be in the count. Tight races will still be up in the air.

“It’s not over on election night, and it hasn’t been for a long, long time,” said Vu. “Close contests are not decided until all the ballots are in the count.”

While you can guess how some races will turn out due to the early numbers, the results for the tight races must wait until election workers process, review and inspect every ballot: precinct, provisional, mail-in and damaged.

“Between mail ballots and provisional ballots, a close race always comes to the very end,” said Vu. “We must do our due diligence to make sure everything is right.”

Some races may not be decided for several weeks. However, the results must be certified 30 days after Election Day on Dec. 6.

For more information, visit sdvote.com or call (858) 565-5800.

‘Dark money’ pushing thumb on council races – The Coast News Group

Thousands of dollars of so-called “dark money” is emerging as a major factor in city council races in a pair of North County cities. In Encinitas and San Marcos, two cities where stakes are high in their respective council races, political action committees have pumped thousands into candidates.

SAN MARCOS-The Deputy Sheriffs Association PAC has received thousands from developers and the Building Industry Association of San Diego and has spent a corresponding amount on candidates throughout the county, almost exclusively on Republican or conservative candidates.

One of the races where the Deputy Sheriffs Association and Building Industry Association’s influence has been most heavily felt is San Marcos, where the PAC has spent thousands in mailers and campaign signs in favor of Rebecca Jones for mayor and council candidates Mike Sannella and Craig Garcia.

Many of the same individual contributors who have contributed to the Building Industry Association’s PAC and the Deputy Sheriffs committee have also contributed to an Irvine-based PAC called the California Taxpayers Coalition, which according to records has spent $10,500 in printing and mailing costs against one of Sannella’s opponents, Randy Walton.

San Marcos Vice Mayor and mayoral candidate Rebecca Jones returned a $250 campaign contribution from a developer behind a 14.4-acre development proposal. Courtesy photo/Facebook

One of the largest contributors to the Taxpayers Coalition is Diversified Projects, Inc., which has contributed $12,5000 to the committee. The Laguna Beach-based company was behind the controversial San Marcos Highlands project. Walton has aligned himself with Chris Orlando, current councilman and mayoral candidate, the lone council member to vote against the Highlands project.

One of the other major contributors is Lance Waite, who is developer behind the Sunshine Gardens project, a 193-unit multi-family project on 14.4-acres near San Marcos’ southeastern city limits that is currently being processed by the city.

Waite contributed $5,000 to each the Taxpayers Coalition and the Deputy Sheriffs PAC. Jones returned a $250 contribution Waite made to her campaign this year. 

San Marcos bars developers from contributing to campaigns within 12 months of a council vote.

Walton, a registered Democrat, said the race has gotten ugly as a result of the mailers paid for, and said developers are actively trying to deceive voters by funneling money into committees that appear to be advocating for taxpayers or law enforcement.

“It’s an outright effort to deceive voters, by putting out mailers saying that something is ‘law enforcement’s choice,’ when in reality, it’s thousands of dollars from developers and the building industry,” Walton said. “Most voters don’t know to look at the campaign finance forms and see who is behind some of these committees.

“And on the other side, there isn’t a group of citizens forming PACs, so there is no countervailing weight and it’s kind of an unfair advantage to the candidates who benefit from them,” Walton said.

“San Marcos has very strict limits on contributions to candidates of just $250,” Jones said in an email to The Coast News. “At that level, it would be difficult for anyone to influence an elected official in our city. As for independent expenditures, they are just that — independent. I have no ability to control their activities and am legally prohibited from doing so.”

The third candidates in the mayor’s and Dist. 2 races, Bradley Zink and Eric Flodine, respectively, have not been the target of any independent expenditures, nor have any been raised on their behalf.

Kousser said that the pattern of developers who otherwise would not be able to contribute to the campaigns due to the city laws contributing even more money through the PACs raises ethical concerns from the donor, not the recipient.

“I would say that the pattern and timing of the donations shows a clear circumvention of the goal of the campaign finance limits,” Kousser said. “But there’s no proof that the candidate is influenced by these contributions. So while it’s not an ethical violation on behalf of the candidate, it looks like a donor is clearly trying to have the same effect on the election and make the same contribution through a different route.”

READ MORE VIA Source: ‘Dark money’ pushing thumb on council races – The Coast News Group

2018 San Marcos Campaign Statements

2018 San Marcos Election Campaign Statements
Residents of San Marcos can study and read about campaign donations from individuals and PACs in past and current elections and 2020 election.

By-district voting begins in San Marcos with 2018 Election -San Elijo Hils and Old Creek Ranch are in District 2

 

The city of San Marcos proactively implements district-based voting and educational campaign to inform voters of the new election process

For the first time, residents in the City of San Marcos will vote for council members by district instead of an at-large election. In preparation for this change, the City of San Marcos is launching “Know Before You Go Vote,” an educational campaign to inform residents about the new election process and what it means for their 2018 ballots.

“We want to help educate our residents about this change because depending on where someone lives, they might not be voting for a council member this election,” said City Clerk Phil Scollick. “We are implementing district-based voting over the next two election cycles as our current council terms expire in 2018 and 2020.”

During this election, only residents from District 1 and District 2, as determined by their voting address, will be selecting a council member. Districts 3 and 4 will then vote for council members during the 2020 election. (City of San Marcos District Map) San Elijo Hils and Old Creek Ranch are in District 2

  • District 1 includes Richmar area and proceeds west to Poinsettia Avenue, east to Woodland Parkway, north to Borden Road and south to the 78 Freeway.
  • District 2 includes San Elijo Hills along with Old Creek Ranch, Discovery Hills, Rancho Dorado and adjoining neighborhoods.
  • District 3 includes area around Cal State San Marcos, the Creek District and Civic Center area, and extends east to the Nordahl Marketplace, west to Rancho Santa Fe Road and north to the 78 Freeway.
  • District 4 includes Santa Fe Hills, Palomar College and neighborhoods north of Borden Road and Santa Fe Road to the west.

To be eligible to run for office in San Marcos, candidates must reside in the district that they seek to represent. All San Marcos residents will continue to vote for the City’s mayor.

The San Marcos city council voluntarily adopted district-based voting in September of 2016 to ensure the City’s taxpayers are not exposed to the risk of future litigation for any alleged violations of the California Voting Rights Act.

San Marcos residents can find their polling place and learn about district voting by visiting, www.san-marcos.net/GoVote.