Tag Archives: Mountain Lion

Mountain lion sighting in San Elijo Hills

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Mountain lion sighting at 4:30 a.m. crossing to the north at San Elijo Road. About half a mile east from the intersection of Double Peak Drive and San Elijo Road. Location and report from San Elijo Life reader.

Read more about Mountain Lions and Safety here:
https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Keep-Me-Wild/Lion

Possible Mountain Lion Sighting in San Elijo Hills/San Marcos

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Possible Mountain Lion Sighting in San Elijo Hills/San Marcos

This is the copy from Sheriff email-We also confirmed the siting with a California Department of Fish and Game Warden searching on the Garden Trail west of Brightwood Drive.

If you live in San Marcos, be aware that mountain lion sightings have been reported in your area.

Deputies from the San Marcos Sheriff’s Station received the call on Sunday, January 19th just after 9:00 a.m. Witnesses reported seeing the mountain lion in the 1500 block of Glencrest Drive, 1700 block of Melrose Drive and 2200 block of Silverado Street in the San Elijo Hills area. Sheriff’s ASTREA flew over the area to search for the mountain lion, but was not able to confirm reports of the sightings.

The California Department of Fish and Game has been notified. Its officers also checked the area, but did not find the big cat. The agency has received unconfirmed reports of mountain lion sightings over the weekend as well.

The following safety tips have been provided by the California Department of Fish and Game:
•Do not feed deer; it is illegal in California and it will attract mountain lions.
•Trim brush to reduce hiding places for mountain lions.
•Don’t allow pets outside when mountain lions are most active—dawn, dusk, and at night.
•Bring pet food inside to avoid attracting raccoons, opossums and other potential mountain lion prey.
•Do not leave small children or pets outside unattended.
•Install motion-sensitive lighting around the house.
•Do not hike, bike, or jog alone.
•Avoid hiking or jogging when mountain lions are most active—dawn, dusk, and at night.
•Do not approach a mountain lion.
•If you encounter a mountain lion, do not run; instead, face the animal, make noise and try to look bigger by waving your arms; throw rocks or other objects. Pick up small children.
•If attacked, fight back
•If a mountain lion attacks a person, immediately call 911.

For questions concerning this incident or to report a mountain lion sighting, call the California Department of Fish and Game at (951) 443-2969.
Contact Information:
California Department of Fish and Game
951-443-2969

10 News Video http://youtu.be/z1vmHfi91mU

 

Mountain lion spotted Wednesday night around 7:00pm

Large mountain lion spotted Wednesday night around 7:00pm. In the vacant Altaire lots in upper San Elijo Hills.

The following safety tips are provided by the California Department of Fish and Game. They are based on studies of mountain behavior and analysis of attacks by mountain lions.

  • Don’t hike alone.
  • Go in groups, with adults supervising children an keep children close to you.
  • Observations of captured mountain lions reveal that the animals seem especially drawn to children.
  • Keep children within your sight at all times.
  • Don’t approach a lion.
  • Most mountain lions will try to avoid a confrontation.
  • Give them a way to escape.
  • Don’t run from a lion.
  • Running stimulates a mountain lion’s instinct to chase.
  • Instead, stand and face the animal. Make eye contact.
  • If you have small children with you, pick them up if possible so that they don’t panic and run.
  • Although it may be awkward, pick them up without bending over or turning away from the lion.
  • Don’t crouch or bend over.
  • A squatting or bending person looks a lot like a four-legged prey animal.
  • Do all you can to appear larger.
  • Raise your arms.
  • Open your jacket if you are wearing one.
  • Throw stones, branches or whatever you can reach without crouching or turning your back.
  • Wave your arms slowly and speak firmly in a loud voice.
  • Fight back if attacked. Some hikers have fought back successfully with sticks, caps, jackets, garden tools and their bare hands.
  • Since a mountain lion usually tries to bite the head or neck, try to remain standing and face the attacking animal.
  • For more information about mountain lions, contact the Department of Fish and Game (DFG), case of emergency call 911 and DFG at 916-445-0045

Mountain Lion Sighting Today in San Elijo Hills around 4:15 AM Monday

A San Elijo Hills resident has reported a mountain lion sighting today in San Elijo Hills around 4:15 AM Monday.

Resident writes:

I spotted an adult mountain lion at 4:15 this morning while running on San Elijo Rd towards Rancho Santa Fe. After passing  the gas station, the animal crossed from my right, approximately 15 feet in front of me and ran across San Elijo Road towards a dirt path near the condos by Albertson’s.

The following safety tips are provided by the California Department of Fish and Game. They are based on studies of mountain behavior and analysis of attacks by mountain lions.

  • Don’t hike alone.
  • Go in groups, with adults supervising children an keep children close to you.
  • Observations of captured mountain lions reveal that the animals seem especially drawn to children.
  • Keep children within your sight at all times.
  • Don’t approach a lion.
  • Most mountain lions will try to avoid a confrontation.
  • Give them a way to escape.
  • Don’t run from a lion.
  • Running stimulates a mountain lion’s instinct to chase.
  • Instead, stand and face the animal. Make eye contact.
  • If you have small children with you, pick them up if possible so that they don’t panic and run.
  • Although it may be awkward, pick them up without bending over or turning away from the lion.
  • Don’t crouch or bend over.
  • A squatting or bending person looks a lot like a four-legged prey animal.
  • Do all you can to appear larger.
  • Raise your arms.
  • Open your jacket if you are wearing one.
  • Throw stones, branches or whatever you can reach without crouching or turning your back.
  • Wave your arms slowly and speak firmly in a loud voice.
  • Fight back if attacked. Some hikers have fought back successfully with sticks, caps, jackets, garden tools and their bare hands.
  • Since a mountain lion usually tries to bite the head or neck, try to remain standing and face the attacking animal.
  • For more information about mountain lions, contact the Department of Fish and Game (DFG), case of emergency call 911 and DFG at 916-445-0045

A Mountain Lion was sighted crossing San Elijo road this morning

A Mountain Lion was sighted crossing San Elijo road this morning (10.13.11)  near San Elijo Hills Chevron & Creekside Cottages. Sheriff was dispatched to check. See post on San Elijo Life Facebook wall.

This is the 2nd resent Mountain Lion sighting in San Elijo Hills another sighting was reported on October 3rd.

The following safety tips are provided by the California Department of Fish and Game. They are based on studies of mountain behavior and analysis of attacks by mountain lions.

  • Don’t hike alone.
  • Go in groups, with adults supervising children an keep children close to you.
  • Observations of captured mountain lions reveal that the animals seem especially drawn to children.
  • Keep children within your sight at all times.
  • Don’t approach a lion.
  • Most mountain lions will try to avoid a confrontation.
  • Give them a way to escape.
  • Don’t run from a lion.
  • Running stimulates a mountain lion’s instinct to chase.
  • Instead, stand and face the animal. Make eye contact.
  • If you have small children with you, pick them up if possible so that they don’t panic and run.
  • Although it may be awkward, pick them up without bending over or turning away from the lion.
  • Don’t crouch or bend over.
  • A squatting or bending person looks a lot like a four-legged prey animal.
  • Do all you can to appear larger.
  • Raise your arms.
  • Open your jacket if you are wearing one.
  • Throw stones, branches or whatever you can reach without crouching or turning your back.
  • Wave your arms slowly and speak firmly in a loud voice.
  • Fight back if attacked. Some hikers have fought back successfully with sticks, caps, jackets, garden tools and their bare hands.
  • Since a mountain lion usually tries to bite the head or neck, try to remain standing and face the attacking animal.
  • For more information about mountain lions, contact the Department of Fish and Game (DFG), case of emergency call 911 and DFG at 916-445-0045

Mountain Lion Sighting in San Elijo Hills

A San Elijo Hills resident of  Sagewood has reported a mountain lion sighting today in San Elijo Hills. The residents  was jogging up to the ridgeline trail entering off Lighthouse Road around 11AM Monday.

Resident writes:

“As I was going up the long steep part with the railing on the side, I noticed an adult sized mountain lion making its way down along the opposite side of the railing.  Once it saw me it ran off into bushes and I assume it made its way down towards the ravine. “

The following safety tips are provided by the California Department of Fish and Game. They are based on studies of mountain behavior and analysis of attacks by mountain lions.

  • Don’t hike alone.
  • Go in groups, with adults supervising children an keep children close to you.
  • Observations of captured mountain lions reveal that the animals seem especially drawn to children.
  • Keep children within your sight at all times.
  • Don’t approach a lion.
  • Most mountain lions will try to avoid a confrontation.
  • Give them a way to escape.
  • Don’t run from a lion.
  • Running stimulates a mountain lion’s instinct to chase.
  • Instead, stand and face the animal. Make eye contact.
  • If you have small children with you, pick them up if possible so that they don’t panic and run.
  • Although it may be awkward, pick them up without bending over or turning away from the lion.
  • Don’t crouch or bend over.
  • A squatting or bending person looks a lot like a four-legged prey animal.
  • Do all you can to appear larger.
  • Raise your arms.
  • Open your jacket if you are wearing one.
  • Throw stones, branches or whatever you can reach without crouching or turning your back.
  • Wave your arms slowly and speak firmly in a loud voice.
  • Fight back if attacked. Some hikers have fought back successfully with sticks, caps, jackets, garden tools and their bare hands.
  • Since a mountain lion usually tries to bite the head or neck, try to remain standing and face the attacking animal.
  • For more information about mountain lions, contact the Department of Fish and Game (DFG), case of emergency call 911 and DFG at 916-445-0045

 

San Elijo Hills – Mountain Lion Tracks Sighted

There have been mountain lion tracks sighted along the Garden Trail in San Elijo Hills. This particular sighting was reported by a homeowner, who researched the tracks before reporting it.

The following safety tips are provided by the California Department of Fish and Game. They are based on studies of mountain behavior and analysis of attacks by mountain lions.

  • Don’t hike alone.
  • Go in groups, with adults supervising children an keep children close to you.
  • Observations of captured mountain lions reveal that the animals seem especially drawn to children.
  • Keep children within your sight at all times.
  • Don’t approach a lion.
  • Most mountain lions will try to avoid a confrontation.
  • Give them a way to escape.
  • Don’t run from a lion.
  • Running stimulates a mountain lion’s instinct to chase.
  • Instead, stand and face the animal. Make eye contact.
  • If you have small children with you, pick them up if possible so that they don’t panic and run.
  • Although it may be awkward, pick them up without bending over or turning away from the lion.
  • Don’t crouch or bend over.
  • A squatting or bending person looks a lot like a four-legged prey animal.
  • Do all you can to appear larger.
  • Raise your arms.
  • Open your jacket if you are wearing one.
  • Throw stones, branches or whatever you can reach without crouching or turning your back.
  • Wave your arms slowly and speak firmly in a loud voice.
  • Fight back if attacked. Some hikers have fought back successfully with sticks, caps, jackets, garden tools and their bare hands.
  • Since a mountain lion usually tries to bite the head or neck, try to remain standing and face the attacking animal.
  • For more information about mountain lions, contact the Department of Fish and Game (DFG), case of emergency call 911 and DFG at 916-445-0045

Mountain Lion sighting in Lake San Marcos

Our neighbors in Lake San Marcos have shared news that there has been a recent Mountain Lion sighting in their community. This is a reminder that we share our surroundings with various wildlife species and we need to consider this as we spend time in the open space areas and trails that surround our homes.

The following safety tips are provided by the California Department of Fish and Game. They are based on studies of mountain behavior and analysis of attacks by mountain lions.

  • Don’t hike alone. Go in groups, with adults supervising children an keep children close to you. Observations of captured mountain lions reveal that the animals seem especially drawn to children. Keep children within your sight at all times.
  • Don’t approach a lion. Most mountain lions will try to avoid a confrontation. Give them a way to escape.
  • Don’t run from a lion. Running stimulates a mountain lion’s instinct to chase. Instead, stand and face the animal. Make eye contact. If you have small children with you, pick them up if possible so that they don’t panic and run. Although it may be awkward, pick them up without bending over or turning away from the lion.
  • Don’t crouch or bend over. A squatting or bending person looks a lot like a four-legged prey animal.
  • Do all you can to appear larger. Raise your arms. Open your jacket if you are wearing one. Throw stones, branches or whatever you can reach without crouching or turning your back. Wave your arms slowly and speak firmly in a loud voice.
  • Fight back if attacked. Some hikers have fought back successfully with sticks, caps, jackets, garden tools and their bare hands. Since a mountain lion usually tries to bite the head or neck, try to remain standing and face the attacking animal. For more information about mountain lions, contact the Department of Fish and Game (DFG), case of emergency call 911 and DFG at 916-445-0045

Here  are some historical clips about Mountain Lions in the San Elijo Hills, San Marcos and Elfin Forest areas

Mountain Lion sighting in Elfin Forest

Neighbors in the Elfin Forest  area have alerted us that there has been a recent Mountain Lion sighting in their community.  A reminder of the December 2007 sighting at Cal State San Marcos of a lion that was thought to have been pushed west by October 2007 fires.
The following safety tips are provided by the California Department of Fish and Game. They are based on studies of mountain behavior and analysis of attacks by mountain lions.
  • Don’t hike alone. Go in groups, with adults supervising children an keep children close to you. Observations of captured mountain lions reveal that the animals seem especially drawn to children. Keep children within your sight at all times.
  • Don’t approach a lion. Most mountain lions will try to avoid a confrontation. Give them a way to escape.
  • Don’t run from a lion. Running stimulates a mountain lion’s instinct to chase. Instead, stand and face the animal. Make eye contact. If you have small children with you, pick them up if possible so that they don’t panic and run. Although it may be awkward, pick them up without bending over or turning away from the lion.
  • Don’t crouch or bend over. A squatting or bending person looks a lot like a four-legged prey animal.
  • Do all you can to appear larger. Raise your arms. Open your jacket if you are wearing one. Throw stones, branches or whatever you can reach without crouching or turning your back. Wave your arms slowly and speak firmly in a loud voice.
  • Fight back if attacked. Some hikers have fought back successfully with sticks, caps, jackets, garden tools and their bare hands. Since a mountain lion usually tries to bite the head or neck, try to remain standing and face the attacking animal. For more information about mountain lions, contact the Department of Fish and Game (DFG), case of emergency call the DFG at 916-445-0045