Tag Archives: The Escondido Creek Conservancy

Coexisting with Coyotes: New Exhibit at the Elfin Forest Recreational Reserve Interpretive Center

The Escondido Creek Conservancy presents a new exhibit, Coexisting with Coyotes, which will be on display in the Interpretive Center at the Elfin Forest Recreational Reserve on September 5th through December 31st.

Coyotes are adaptable and found almost everywhere in San Diego County—including wild lands, suburban neighborhoods, and even in our cities. As coyotes continue to lose their traditional habitat and are driven onto human-occupied areas, the conflict between humans and coyotes has increased. Between 1998 and 2015 there were 90 reported coyote attacks on humans in California. In contrast, there were 2,446 documented cases of foodborne illness in California during this same period—so in effect, people are 27 times more at risk from their food than from coyotes. Nevertheless, coyotes do pose a risk to people and their pets, and public concern continues to mount. But coyotes are an important part of our ecosystem, and coexistence with them is possible, which is the aim of this exhibit.

Featuring puzzles, audio, art, taxidermy, and more, this interactive exhibit provides facts about these clever animals and dispels common myths. It also outlines specific things people can do to keep their family and pets safe while still keeping these beneficial creatures wild and free.

The exhibit was conceived by Dr. Adena Boxer-Capitano, a former veterinarian. She’s also an educator and a docent at the Elfin Forest Recreational Reserve. She started the Coyote Coexistence Project and is dedicated to helping communities develop plans to coexist with the wildlife that share our neighborhoods.

The Interpretive Center at the Elfin Forest Recreational Reserve is open seven days a week, 8:00-3:00, depending on volunteer docent availability. An updated weekly schedule of Interpretive Center hours can be found at https://elfinforest.olivenhain.com/.

Cocos Fire: 4 Years Later – The Escondido Creek Conservancy

Almost 2,000 acres burned, 40 structures destroyed, and almost $5.7 million dollars in property damage were caused by the Coco’s Fire. The fire was ignited by a 14-year-old girl in her backyard on May 14th, 2014. Fire season typically starts in October after the summer has dried out the vegetation but California was experiencing one of its worst droughts on record — leaving it particularly vulnerable. The Conservancy decided to turn the tragedy of the fire into an opportunity to document the rebirth of the ecosystem, to monitor the burned areas over time, to see what could be learned by taking photos of the same sites for five years. We are now in year four of that monitoring. Read more via Source: Cocos Fire: 4 Years Later – The Escondido Creek Conservancy

Free Talk: Amphibians and Reptiles of San Diego County, at the Elfin Forest Interpretive Center

Free Talk: Amphibians and Reptiles of San Diego County, Thursday, April 18th from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the Elfin Forest Interpretive Center

With its varied topography of coast, mountains, and desert, the San Diego region, considered one of the world’s biodiversity hotspots, boasts a rich variety of amphibians and reptiles – from the arboreal salamander to the green sea turtle to the secretive San Diego banded gecko and the red diamond rattlesnake, many of which are endangered species.

Jeff Lemm, an herpetologist from the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, will talk on identification, habitats, biology, and the conservation status of all 85 amphibian and reptile species found in the San Diego region as well as snakebite safety and conservation.

Pre-registration required by calling Ann Hough at (760) 471 9354 or sending an email to information@escondidocreek.org. The event is free, donations to The Escondido Creek Conservancy welcome.

http://sanelijolife.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/Flyer_for_Amphibians__Reptiles_Lecture.pdf

Investors Grant The Escondido Creek Conservancy a One Year Reprieve to Save Skyline east of San Elijo Hills from Development

At the eleventh hour, The Escondido Creek Conservancy (TECC) has secured an agreement with a group of investors who have stepped in to purchase and hold the property known as University Heights from ING bank and provide TECC with a one year option, giving the Conservancy time to secure permanent protection for this land for the benefit and enjoyment of all County residents, now and into the future.

The land, dubbed University Heights on development plans, due to it’s proximity to the California State University of San Marcos, and also known locally as “Sleeping Lady Ridge”, because the silhouette of the land resembles a sleeping woman – consists of 502 acres south of San Marcos and west of Escondido. It takes in the summit, southern slopes and a secluded valley below Mt Whitney, a prominent local high point. This pristine landscape supports the many plants and animals of the chaparral, sage scrub and oak woodland habitats. Located between the trail systems of San Marcos and those of the Elfin Forest Recreational Reserve and County of San Diego Parks and Recreation lands, Sleeping Lady Ridge represents a tremendous opportunity for connected outdoor recreation for hikers, bikers and equestrians – without the need for long travel distances. At least two development schemes have been proposed for the land, with up to 1000 new homes suggested, the most recent ending in foreclosure – opening the door for TECC to preserve this valuable
resource permanently.

“We are not out of the woods yet,” said Steve Barker, TECC’s Member-at-Large. “This is a great step forward and over the next 12 months, TECC will be working with Federal, State and County agencies to try and secure the funds to preserve the property permanently. I really want to thank everyone who has made a donation to this project. Thanks to their generosity it has been possible to cover the cost of putting the property into escrow. TECC will need to spend a further $100,000.00 in option payments to the investor group during 2013, so we are counting on the continued support of the community to save this beautiful natural space which provides such important refuge for wildlife. While the new owners have given TECC a year to secure the funding for a conservation purchase, if funds cannot be raised, they will sell it on the private market.”

If you would like to make a donation to the University Heights project, become a member of the Conservancy or for more information visit www.escondidocreek.org. Checks can be sent to TECC, P.O.Box 460791, Escondido, CA 92046.

About The Escondido Creek Conservancy
TECC is a local land conservancy which is dedicated to the preservation, enhancement and protection of the natural open space within the Escondido creek watershed. Since 1991 TECC has preserved over 2000 acres of open space through direct purchase or by working in partnership with its members,donors, landowners, government agencies and community groups.