Tag Archives: Vote

By-district voting begins in San Marcos with 2018 Election -San Elijo Hils and Old Creek Ranch are in District 2

 

The city of San Marcos proactively implements district-based voting and educational campaign to inform voters of the new election process

For the first time, residents in the City of San Marcos will vote for council members by district instead of an at-large election. In preparation for this change, the City of San Marcos is launching “Know Before You Go Vote,” an educational campaign to inform residents about the new election process and what it means for their 2018 ballots.

“We want to help educate our residents about this change because depending on where someone lives, they might not be voting for a council member this election,” said City Clerk Phil Scollick. “We are implementing district-based voting over the next two election cycles as our current council terms expire in 2018 and 2020.”

During this election, only residents from District 1 and District 2, as determined by their voting address, will be selecting a council member. Districts 3 and 4 will then vote for council members during the 2020 election. (City of San Marcos District Map) San Elijo Hils and Old Creek Ranch are in District 2

  • District 1 includes Richmar area and proceeds west to Poinsettia Avenue, east to Woodland Parkway, north to Borden Road and south to the 78 Freeway.
  • District 2 includes San Elijo Hills along with Old Creek Ranch, Discovery Hills, Rancho Dorado and adjoining neighborhoods.
  • District 3 includes area around Cal State San Marcos, the Creek District and Civic Center area, and extends east to the Nordahl Marketplace, west to Rancho Santa Fe Road and north to the 78 Freeway.
  • District 4 includes Santa Fe Hills, Palomar College and neighborhoods north of Borden Road and Santa Fe Road to the west.

To be eligible to run for office in San Marcos, candidates must reside in the district that they seek to represent. All San Marcos residents will continue to vote for the City’s mayor.

The San Marcos city council voluntarily adopted district-based voting in September of 2016 to ensure the City’s taxpayers are not exposed to the risk of future litigation for any alleged violations of the California Voting Rights Act.

San Marcos residents can find their polling place and learn about district voting by visiting, www.san-marcos.net/GoVote.

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2016 Presidential General Election- San Marcos Election Results

San Marcos Election Results and Measure B.

Winners:

Rebecca Jones and Sharon Jenkins re-elected to City Council.

screen-shot-2016-11-09-at-7-08-19-pm

Randy Walton, Janet McClean, Victor Grahm-San Marcos Unified School Boardscreen-shot-2016-11-09-at-7-07-51-pm

Vallecitos Water Distric Div 5
Hal Martin

screen-shot-2016-11-09-at-7-07-37-pm

Vallecitos Water Distric Div 5
Mike Sannellascreen-shot-2016-11-09-at-7-07-25-pm

Measure B-Lilac Hills –
No 64%
Yes 36%screen-shot-2016-11-09-at-7-05-09-pm

Complete Unofficial Results Here

 

City poised to shake up voting system | SanDiegoUnionTribune.com

SAN MARCOS — San Marcos is poised to become the second North County city to elect City Council members by district, after being threatened with a lawsuit alleging its at-large elections disenfranchise Latino voters.

Mayor Jim Desmond said Tuesday that nothing’s set in stone, but that the proposed change will be hammered out in public hearings in the coming weeks and months. He said it was “prudent” to move to district elections in the face of a potential lawsuit.“I think fighting this is a waste of taxpayer dollars because every city that has challenged this has lost,” Desmond said.The city was put on notice in December when Malibu-based attorney Kevin Shenkman sent a letter saying San Marcos’ elections are “racially polarized” and violate the California Voting Rights Act. He noted that Latinos make up 37 percent of the city’s population, yet no Latinos have been elected to the council in about two decades.Shenkman has sued or threatened to sue other Southern California cities on behalf of Southwest Voter Registration Project, a Latino voting rights organization.Escondido moved to district elections in 2013 after another group threatened a similar lawsuit.“It is our belief that San Marcos’ at-large system dilutes the ability of minority residents — particularly Latinos, a protected class — to elect candidates of their choice, or otherwise influence the outcome of San Marcos’ council elections,” Shenkman said in the letter.

The City Council has been discussing the potential litigation for months in closed session and, on June 14, directed city staff to study possible boundaries for election districts and hire a demographer to create some maps.One option would create four council districts, with the mayor elected in an at-large vote; another option would create five council districts, each electing its own representative. The city has roughly 93,000 residents.At least one district must contain a heavy concentration of Latino voters and would mostly likely include the city’s Richmar neighborhood, straddling state Route 78 and moving west to city limits. READ MORE VIA Source: City poised to shake up voting system | SanDiegoUnionTribune.com

Interview with Mike Hunsaker candidate for San Marcos City Council

Here is an interview with Mike Hunsaker candidate for San Marcos City Council. San Elijo Life has invited all candidates for council the answer the same set of questions.

Why should the residents in San Elijo Hills vote for you?

San Elijo Hills is poorly served by the proposed General Plan, overly lavish employee perks, lagging infrastructure improvements and lack of transparency in government. I will address these issues with common sense solutions.

How can the council help address aggressive cut through traffic and school traffic in San Elijo Hills?

The lagging infrastructure needs to be reprioritized. Too much of the Redevelopment Agency funds that are supposed to go into infrastructure are being diverted into revenue supporting City labor costs. That needs to be reversed.

What is your position on Proposition K?

The need for Proposition K at the present time and conditions is undeniable. However, serious issues are present concerning why much of this funding is required. Mello Roos payments should have covered many of the needs. Where did that money go? Dig developers escape their fair share of impact fees? Why have known problems with asbestos and lead been allowed to continue in the schools over decades while more and more money was diverted into employee compensation? These issues are not being corrected.

How can the city of San Marcos work with San Elijo Development to complete the San Elijo Hills Town Center?

Employee pension expenses have exploded and are continuing on a steep upward curve. Most cities experienced just over 200% growth in pension costs over the last ten years. San Marcos experienced a 572% growth. Too much money is being diverted to fund this growth at the expense of such projects as these which better serve the community.

What is your position on changes to the San Marcos general plan?

I have analyzed the problems with this plan in depth on my website www.hunsakerinnovations.com. The proposed plan is not necessarily what the Council will see. The zoning ordinances underpinning the Plan have not been updated, the economic study identifying economic projections and the even the boundaries and designations of zones are undefined. Without these very basic definitions and concepts, the proposed General Plan is meaningless. Councilman Preston rightly opposed the expensive public forums which were more for political cover than informed citizen evaluations.

What is your position on future housing and commercial development around San Elijo Hills (Creekside District, and university area projects, recycling plant, Quathaven and Attebury road area)?

Commercial development near to San Elijo Hills is badly needed as well as better roads. Much of the Creekside District consists of redundant facilities which will be stressed to survive much less prosper. The recycling plant is a potentially valuable asset allowed to languish. Possible useful  alternatives would be an industrial center, a shipping center (which will provide tax dollars for road improvements), or even a large storage facility.

What are your goals to improve the quality of life in San Marcos, such as events, parks, and trails?

I am currently working in the Walnut Grove Park area organizing more community activities in that Park. My wife plans on helping with the Heritage Homes.

Would you care to comment on the recent excessive compensation concerns for San Marcos city staff?

I am a member of the San Diego Taxpayer Association who has been active in uncovering and monitoring the lavish pay and benefits given to City employees. I suspect that unless firm action is taken these costs will continue to skyrocket. A number of employees are eager to acquire lifetime medical benefits and higher COLA’s in retirement. These increases will bankrupt the City and consume every dollar leaving nothing for projects. All three labor contracts will expire in 2011. These Council is considering shifting to a multiyear budgeting plan which could conceal the costs of new contracts until after the 2012 elections. I have recently attended a special Taxpayer Association seminar on pension plans in the County. My report is on the website.

If elected what are the top 3 issues you would focus on for San Elijo Hills?

1.     More infrastructure investments, not more pension benefits (now already the most generous in San Diego County).

2.     More balanced commercial development meeting local needs for grocery stores, drug stores, home improvement outlets, restaurants, etc.

3.     Ensuring that new developments pay their fair share so that another Proposition K is needed again for what should be normal expenses.

How will you clean up the campaign signs after election? will they be recycled?

I have no campaign signs. My campaign works entirely off the Internet and is totally green.

www.hunsakerinnovations.com

Editors note all San Marcos, Calfifornia candidates are welcome to contact us to conduct an interview.

Interview with Mike Hansen candidate for San Marcos City Council

Here is an interview with Mike Hansen candidate for San Marcos City Council. San Elijo Life has invited all candidates for council the answer the same set of questions.

Why should the residents in San Elijo Hills vote for you?

San Elijo Hills, like all San Marcos’ residents, deserves a leader who not only listens to their concerns but actively represents their best interests. Especially as millions of Americans struggle to survive in a crippled economy, San Marcos needs leadership which will advocate for small business and the common tax payer. By holding true to my principles of individual liberty and fiscal conservatism- San Marcos residents will always know where I stand.  I promise serve as an honest, respectable and passionate advocate for all people of San Marcos.

How can the council help address aggressive cut through traffic and school traffic in San Elijo Hills?

Though difficult to eliminate, multiple traffic issues can be greatly reduced by applying additional Deputies for traffic control. The idea of additional motorcycle patrols has been introduced, which I am also in support of.

What is your position on Proposition K?

Simplified, I am opposed.

I find myself unable to support this ballot measure because of my principle of fiscal restraint. Do I believe that many schools, especially San Marcos High school, need to be renovated and/ or rebuilt? Absolutely. Though I understand that it is less expensive to conduct building projects during a sluggish economy, it is a double edge sword. Many families throughout San Marcos are struggling to stabilize in rough economic times- and an additional Bond measure would only intensify their situation.

I have found that many residents, on all sides of the argument, are confused on the Bond and what it means for their future. The slogans “K for Kids” and “Bonds = Tax” are often the only points of discussion. This confusion and misinterpretation of language could have been mitigated by better communication with the community before becoming a bond initiative. By increasing community involvement and encouraging constructive debate on the issue potential problems and fears for many residents could be addressed and “ironed out.”

In place of a forty-year, $287,000,000 bond (Supplemented with $93 Million from Federal and State taxpayer money)- dealing with each school as they need assistance is important. We do want to promote our city with attractive schools and solid quality of education, but not at the risk of perpetuating a culture of taxing the future based on the assumption that “the economy will bounce back to normal.”

I am 24 years old. I plan on having children and sending them through San Marcos’ schools. Though down the road, this is a strong factor in my own self-reflection on policy stance. I want my future children to benefit from a strong education and live in an even better San Marcos than I was privileged to move to. Renovating these school is essential, but so is maintaining an affordable cost of living accompanied by a culture of fiscal accountability.

How can the city of San Marcos work with San Elijo Development to complete the San Elijo Hills Town Center?

As the economy struggles to recover, it is difficult to expect developers to rapidly assemble to intensify vacant properties. I believe that the Council should advocate for a more attractive relationship between business and government. By examining the city’s permitting fees and requirements for fairness and feasibility we can alleviate one of business’s more controllable burdens. The council should also support and encourage the Chamber of Commerce in promoting San Elijo Hills as an attractive place to shop and conduct business.

What is your position on changes to the San Marcos general plan?

I am in support of updating our General Plan. San Marcos is in need of solutions for positive growth assisted by open dialogue with the community. By planning how to best balance population, commercial, industrial and residential impact we can create a more sustainable city. Dealing with traffic, updating infrastructure and respecting property rights all creates an interesting challenge for the city to undertake.

What is your position on future housing and commercial development around San Elijo Hills (Creekside District, and university area projects, recycling plant, Quathaven and Attebury road area)?

I look forward to the future possibilities that the Creek Project and developments in the University District have to offer for San Marcos. Future housing and commercial development will add to San Marcos’ atmosphere of diverse residential life and business opportunities. Strong deliberation and planning must be taken to ensure infrastructure and traffic concerns are considered.

What are your goals to improve the quality of life in San Marcos, such as events, parks, and trails?

As the council has often discussed, San Marcos is in need of a signature event. I would like to see the city council endorse and advocate for more city-wide events, which will not only benefit local business but help foster a stronger sense of community and city identity. I also believe that parks and trails are essential to maintaining an esthetically pleasing backdrop for San Marcos and should receive further encouragement from the council.

Would you care to comment on the recent excessive compensation concerns for San Marcos city staff?

Following the gross mismanagement in Bell, citizens throughout the nation have been concerned with local government pay. Positions such as City Manager have been under intense scrutiny for salary and compensation. Though I feel that San Marcos is relatively efficient in comparison with neighboring cities, it would be unwise not to examine the efficiency and feasibility of government appointed positions. It should be noted that while other cities have been forced to lay off staff because of municipal budget problems, San Marcos has maintained a consistently thrifty doctrine for payroll.

If elected what are the top 3 issues you would focus on for San Elijo Hills?

– Work with community to combat traffic problems, mainly from “cut through” and University Traffic.  As new developments and the University community grow the Council will be challenged to come up with new solutions in preventing traffic congestion.
– Public safety. A combination of support for the San Diego Sheriff’s Department and the San Marcos Fire Department is crucial to maintaining a safe and secure atmosphere, improving San Elijo Hill’s resident’s quality of living. Responsible allocation of City resources is necessary to preserve public safety while maintaining fiscal accountability.
– Attracting small business to San Elijo Hills (as well as the rest of San Marcos), bringing in customers and tax revenue.

How will you clean up the campaign signs after election? will they be recycled?

From the beginning, my campaign has planned to recycle all signs, fliers and remaining door hangers. Majority of our campaign’s signs and material are printed on 30%+ recycled paper and cardboard. Unlike the Hansen 2010’s gradual increase in signage placement, our signs will be rapidly removed- including our large “Hansen 2010” sign and all 74 “small” signs. We pledge that all signs will be removed within a week of the polls closing.

www.hansen2010.com

Editors note all San Marcos, Calfifornia candidates are welcome to contact us to conduct an interview.

Interview with Mike Preston candidate for San Marcos City Council

Here is an interview with incumbent Mike Preston who is running for San Marcos City Council. San Elijo Life has invited all candidates for council the answer the same set of questions.

Why should the residents in San Elijo Hills vote for you?

I realize that in this election year there is an anti-incumbent mood. However, unlike the federal, state, and many other local governments, San Marcos has bucked the trends for many years by balancing budgets, improving public services, adding Parks and trails without raising taxes. I believe my fiscal conservatism and independent voice are assets that have benefited San Elijo Hills and San Marcos. For instance when I introduced the Parks and trails master plan years ago it required tenacity to overcome the objections of other council members and the development community to make it the reality we all enjoy today. I fought hard to get Twin Oaks Valley/ San Elijo road completed and with it the opening of fire station #4. The extension of Twin Oaks/San Elijo road also enticed Albertson’s to open their store in San Elijo Hills. I believe my experience, fiscal conservatism, and independence will be needed as we move the city forward in these challenging times.

How can the council help address aggressive cut through traffic and school traffic in San Elijo Hills?

I have advocated for years the necessity of at least one more motorcycle patrol to enforce traffic problems throughout the city. More aggressive traffic enforcement in problem areas will help this issue.

What is your position on Proposition K?

I am neutral on Prop K. I believe it is a personal decision on whether you want to raise your taxes to build and rehabilitate schools. I have chosen not to use my position to influence voters because I recognize how difficult it is for some to increase their taxes when they may be losing their jobs and houses.

How can the city of San Marcos work with San Elijo Development to complete the San Elijo Hills Town Center?

I think it is difficult to use the governmental stick when the economy is more the problem than the willingness of the developer to complete the downtown. I have asked city staff to review our permit processes to determine if we can be more user friendly to new and existing businesses that want to expand. The cost and time of the permitting process has been a hindrance to some businesses. Additionally, I think the city can be actively involved in advertising the city as a great place to shop. This project, if approved, could entice new retailers to the city and the San Elijo Hills downtown area.

What is your position on changes to the San Marcos general plan?

The general plan update will guide the build out of San Marcos for the next 20 – 30 years. The significant issues to be decided are population increase, traffic impacts and mitigation, and the balance of commercial, residential, office, and industrial development.

The build out of San Marcos will require us to be vigilant on how we mitigate the impacts to our existing infrastructure, especially traffic. The mitigation of these traffic impacts will be a key focus of mine as we process the approval of a new general plan.

Another area that will be important to me is the balance of new commercial, residential, office, and industrial development. While commercial provides the city with an important revenue stream, I think it is important to also create job opportunities via industrial and office development.

What is your position on future housing and commercial development around San Elijo Hills (Creekside District, and university area projects, recycling plant, Quathaven and Attebury road area)?

I am excited about building a new downtown San Marcos (Creekside District, and university area projects). My primary concern is how we mitigate the traffic impacts so that these new projects do not worsen peak hour traffic in San Marcos. I have not seen any plans for the recycling plant, Questhaven and Attebury road areas, so it is difficult to comment in any specificity. I believe that whatever is proposed and presented for those areas should be publicly vetted and be of a quality that San Marcos can accept.

What are your goals to improve the quality of life in San Marcos, such as events, parks, and trails?

Insure that San Marcos remains fiscally strong so that we can afford the improvements to our quality of life; like Parks and trails.

Continue to improve emergency services; law enforcement response times, gang and graffiti enforcement, and fire protection.

Continue to add Parks and trails.

Insure that we continue to improve traffic flow through new and expanded streets and roads, high tech traffic synchronization, and traffic enforcement.

Would you care to comment on the recent excessive compensation concerns for San Marcos city staff?

“Fifty of the 88 employees who earned more than $100,000 last fiscal year were firefighters, many of whom entered that salary range with overtime that increased their total compensation by 15 to 30 percent” (NCT).

We made a decision to pay more overtime rather than hire more employees. This actually resulted in a savings (recruitment, training, and benefits) and lessens the need for potential layoffs down the road.

Additionally, we pay our employees longevity pay which most cities do not. This helps us retain good people and saves on recruitment and training costs. We balance this with fewer employees working harder (we have one of the lowest employee to population ratios in the county) and by contracting out wherever possible (street sweeping, landscape maintenance, etc).

If you examine our bottom line, operating expenses versus population, then we again are one of the lowest in the county.

We will have to address pensions this fiscal year and negotiate a reasonable compromise that insures a highly motivated work force and sustainable pensions. I will be open-minded about pension reform and my first allegiance is to the taxpayers and citizens of San Marcos.

If elected what are the top 3 issues you would focus on for San Elijo Hills?

Better traffic enforcement and control.

Developing a retail strategy that attracts new customers and businesses.

Insuring that the new creekside and University projects do not worsen peak hour traffic in San Elijo Hills and San Marcos.

How will you clean up the campaign signs after election? will they be recycled?

I personally drive around and collect all of my “small” campaign signs and then recycle them. My yard signs in neighborhoods will be recycled by the homeowner who graciously allowed me to place them there. I have previously introduced an ordinance that would restrict the signs to no larger then 16 square feet because I personally feel the large 32 square foot signs are overkill and a driver distraction. The smaller size would improve the visual clutter of campaign signs. I will once again introduce this ordinance and hope for better results.

www.mikepreston.com

Editors note all San Marcos, California candidates are welcome to contact us to conduct an interview.

Last Weekend To Submit Ballots San Elijo Hills Election

Time to VOTE!

This weekend is the last weekend to submit your ballot for the San Elijo Hills measure to recall and re-elect the San Elijo Hills Board of Directors.  There are many San Elijo Hills neighborhoods that have not yet met quorum requirements.

The San Elijo Hills Association office (at the Visitor Center) will be staffed on Saturday from 8:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. to assist homeowners with this process and provide new ones ballots for those homeowners who misplaced them.

There are three ways to submit your ballot:

1) Drop it in the ballot box located at the Visitor Center prior to March 10.
2) Mail it to the Inspector of Elections so that it is received prior to March 10.
3) Bring it to the meeting on March 10 at 10:00 a.m. at Walters Management.

2010 SPECIAL MEETING OF NEIGHBORHOOD REPRESENTATIVES TO VOTE ON RECALLING BOARD AND ELECTING NEW DIRECTORS AND CALL FOR CANDIDATES

San Elijo Hills residents should have all revived this formal notification Saturday from San Elijo Hill’s Association:

2010 SPECIAL MEETING OF NEIGHBORHOOD REPRESENTATIVES TO VOTE ON RECALLING BOARD AND ELECTING NEW DIRECTORS AND CALL FOR CANDIDATES

The San Elijo Hills Community Association received a petition from Neighborhood Representatives of the community requesting the following (excerpts from petition):

Due to various areas of concern regarding the election, the neighborhood representatives hereby submit this petition to call a special meeting, the purpose of which is to recall the new Board and hold a re-election. The specific areas of concern that are driving this petition are as follows:

1.     There are residents whose votes were not counted because their Neighborhood Representative did not attend the meeting on December 8th.

2.     There are residents who were not aware that [a candidate] had withdrawn her name, and who otherwise would likely have voted for a different candidate.

3.     There are residents who voted prior to the start of the negative campaigning and who subsequently indicated a desire to change their votes, but were not allowed to.

This petition is about the election process itself, not about who either won or did not win the election.  It’s an effort to make the election fair to the residents casting their votes, and an opportunity to start fresh. It will be up to the individual candidates to make their own cases, and [we] would like to suggest that this happen in an open “meet the candidates’ question-and-answer forum.

The entire petition is posted on the Community Network at www.sanelijohills.net.  In accordance with Section 6.3 of the San Elijo Hills Bylaws, the Board of Directors shall facilitate the scheduling of the Special Meeting of Neighborhood Representatives upon receipt of a petition signed by Representatives from at least 5% of the community.  The petition was signed by Representatives representing 49% of the community and therefore met the threshold requirements. Just as in a regular election, all homeowners will receive ballots and have an opportunity to cast votes at the Neighborhood District Meetings. The ballots will include two measures: 1) whether the Board of Directors should be recalled; and 2) if a recall passes, the election of new directors. An independent Inspector of Elections will oversee and count the ballots, and the voting process will be consistent with the Association’s election rules and current California law. Following is a schedule of meetings needed to facilitate this process:

Meet the Candidates Night: Tuesday, February 2, 2010 at 6:00 p.m. at the Pepper Tree Hills Café

Neighborhood District Meetings: Wednesday, March 10, 2010 at 10:00 a.m. at Walters Management

Special Meeting of Neighborhoods: Thursday, March 18 at 6:00 p.m. at San Elijo Elementary School

Additional information regarding each meeting as well as voting instructions will be mailed to homeowners, posted on the Community Network, and posted on the community bulletin board.

If you have any questions regarding this process, please contact Jean Salvia, Community Association Manager, at (760) 431-2522 or jsalvia@waltersmanagement.com.

If you would like to be considered for the Board of Directors should the measure to recall the current Board prevail, please complete and return the Candidate Nomination Form no later than Thursday, January 21, 2010. Please note: nominations must be received no later than 5:00 p.m. on January 21st in order to be included on the ballot.

Special San Elijo Hills Association Board Meeting

Special San Elijo Hills Association Board meeting this Monday, January 4th 2010

Location: Stagecoach Park Community Building (across from La Costa Canyon High School & Henry’s ) 3240 Camino de los Coches in Carlsbad

Agenda:
6:00 pm  – Call To Order

6:00 pm  – Election of Officers

6:05 pm – Petition from Neighborhood Representatives

6:20 pm – Homeowner Forum

6:30 pm – Potential Formation of Executive Committee due to Developer board member conflict of interest (Pending consultation with Legal Counsel)

6:45 pm – Adjournment to Executive session to discuss potential executive committee if necessary