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La Costa Town Square (next to Noodles & Company and Project Pie)

#3410 Via Mercato, Suite 102
Carlsbad, CA 92009

Hernandez drops out of San Marcos council race – The Coast News Group

SAN MARCOS — A challenger has dropped out of the San Marcos City Council race, narrowing the field to three.Ruben “RJ” Hernandez, who was one of two newcomers — Matthew Stack is the other — challenging incumbents Rebecca Jones and Sharon Jenkins, recently announced he was withdrawing from the race due to financial issues.Hernandez, 35, was a self-described “independent, pro-business, anti-fire and pro-opportunity” candidate.“Meaning, I’m here to bolster business growth (jobs), protect our community from fire and work with and within the community to give those looking to step up and advance, the chance to do so,” Hernandez said on his page.According to a statement he emailed to the San Diego Union-Tribune, Hernandez said the campaign caused “business and financial setbacks that have made it untenable for me to continue.”

READ MORE VIA Source: Hernandez drops out of SM council race – The Coast News Group

San Marcos opts for district elections – The Coast News Group

SAN MARCOS — The city of San Marcos will become the second North County city to elect its council members by electoral districts rather than in citywide elections.The San Marcos City Council voted last week to change its election system after receiving a litigation threat last year that alleged the city’s at-large voting system discriminated against Latino voters.The changes will take effect for the 2018 election, when three of the council seats are up for election.The council’s unanimous vote was made reluctantly, as several of the council members said they were concerned that the change could prove to politically divide the community.San Marcos received a litigation threat in December 2015 from a Malibu-based law firm that said the city’s at-large system “dilutes the ability of … Latinos… to elect the candidate of their choice or otherwise influence the outcome of San Marcos’ council elections.”According to the letter, San Marcos, which is 37 percent Latino, had not elected a minority council member in 22 years.The city’s most recent election in 2014 was cancelled after no candidates emerged to challenge the incumbents. This year, two challengers emerged against the two incumbents, Rebecca Jones and Sharon Jenkins.The new voting districts include one that has 70 percent Latino population, largely centered around the Richmar community in central San Marcos.The other three districts have much smaller Latino populations.San Marcos officials also approved their preferred district map, which splits the city into four voting districts. The fifth seat on the council, the mayor, will still be voted at large.The boundaries of the four districts are roughly as follows:• District 1, which includes Richmar, stretches west to Poinsettia Avenue, east to Woodland Parkway, north to Borden Road and South to the 78 Freeway.• District 2 includes the neighborhoods of San Elijo Hills and Discovery Hills and extends west to White Sands Drive, east to Questhaven Hills, south to the southern tip of San Elijo Hills and north to San Marcos Creek.• District 3 includes much of the Creekside District, Cal State San Marcos and the Heart of the City District and extends east to the Nordahl Marketplace, west to Rancho Santa Fe Road, south to the southern tip of the university’s sphere of influence and north to the 78 freeway.• District 4 includes Palomar College and Santa Fe Hills and is generally the rest of the city north of Borden Road and Santa Fe Road to the west.Each district represents roughly 8,000 voters.Districts 1 and 2 will be decided in 2018; districts 3 and 4 will follow in 2020.

READ MORE VIA Source: San Marcos opts for district elections – The Coast News Group

Dear San Marcos Candidates

Letter to the editor-

Dear San Marcos Candidates,

As a mother of three children, all attending the three most impacted schools in the San Marcos Unified School District, I would like to ask how you would help alleviate the impacted schools and align the city’s growth plan with the school districts size. I was a parent representative on the 2013 attendance boundary committee for San Elijo Elementary.  As a member of the committee, I saw the need of alleviating the impacted schools of Discovery, San Elijo Elementary, and San Elijo Middle was critical.  The boundaries were realigned in an attempt to best address the impacted schools and a recommendation was made in favor of creating a K-8 school. This recommendation did not address the even larger concern, where do all of the elementary and middle school students attend for high school if those multiple schools are at capacity? How do you feed twelve elementary schools with average student populations of 1,000 into four middle schools, and ultimately  into two high school? What happens when more development occurs? I posed the question then to the committee of what  was the capacity of both Mission Hills High School and San Marcos High school.  I was told 2800 and 3200 respectively after additional buildings and portables added.  Surely, creating one K-8 school does not fully address the underlying problem of rapid city development and growth resulting in a larger student population impacting all  school grades. My children attend San Elijo Elementary,  San Elijo Middle,  and San Marcos High each school has the largest student population of their respective grade level school populations. San Elijo Elementary has 1,100 students in attendance,  granted this has decreased significantly by the opening of Double Peak for the 2016-2017 school year. San Elijo Middle has a student population of over 1,900 and is the largest middle school  in the district, whose attendance area includes Carlsbad and San Marcos. San Marcos High school has a student population of 3,200 which is at capacity according to the 2012-2013 attendance boundary committee projection. What happens with the influx of future students that will come with the completed development of the former quarry area, the college, and creek side development.  Where will those students from elementary through high school attend? The San Marcos Unified School district does NOT own any land for future school development. This  was an  issue in the acquiring land and developing Double Peak K -8. San Marcos High school is at its projected capacity and Mission Hills has a student population of 2600 of the 2800 capacity. In addition to the development in San Elijo Hills/Discovery/CSUSM area there has been the addition of multi unit family homes along Norhdal, Mission Rd, and Twin Oaks north of the 78. Those areas are just in City of San Marcos. The San Marcos Unified School District is comprised of  portions of Carlsbad, Escondido, San Marcos, Vista, and Unicorporated County areas. That means five seperate areas within the district  have their own city growth design, development, and approval process. I understand all those cities and unicorporated  areas within the district boundary pay taxes to the school district. How do you align reasonable and responsible school growth size when another city or San Marcos itself approves 20, 100, 400 homes for development?

What will your role be in creating a responsible balance between city growth and development as well as maintain an excellent school district and not create overcrowed underfunded schools?

Alexis Barbuto
Voter and Mother of 3 students in San Marcos Unified School District

*** Editors Note-We welcome letters to the editor and political statements from San Marcos Candidates -San Elijo Life


Dear Candidates,

I am responding to your inquiry with regards to the  piece I wrote and was posted on San Elijo Life Facebook. As stated within my letter, I am interested in how you will be able to align the City Council and the School District to provide balanced development and adequate schools for the growing student population in San Marcos. This seems to be a difficult task when all of the North County School Districts are comprised of multiple cities and unincorporated areas that are not solely within the city itself as implied by the name of the school district. Another example beyond San Marcos Unified’s composition, residents in Carlsbad  could live in an area in that city where their children attend either Encinitas Union/San Dieguito Unified for middle and high school, Carlsbad Unified or Oceanside Unified. How will north county cities which are all under rapid development create smart growth to support their school districts, when the school districts themselves were drawn including multiple cities? How can one city tell another to stop developing homes because it will affect another’s school district? Can San Marcos City Council really demand Carlsbad or Escondido to not approve more housing developments because the San Marcos Unified School District does not have land to build another school or currently the schools are overcrowded? The problem is multifaceted the school district boundaries drawn years ago, included multiple municipalities under one educational district roof.

Cities, NOT school districts approve and design development plans.

In addition to the fact the district itself does not own real estate for future development. The city approves plans without looking into whether or not the school district can support more students in certain areas.  Where would a new middle school or high school be developed in the high population density and development areas that drastically need another campus to alleviate the problem? Those areas don’t have land to purchase and build another school or are slated for more homes and businesses. The district is then forced to find a parcel to purchase large enough to sustain a school and traffic needs, but must maintain that school.  Will the San Marcos City Council rezone areas or transfer city owned land to the school district to accommodate land acquisition? What happens when a campus needs to be built within another city in the district to meet the demands of a growing student population such as Escondido or Carlsbad? How will the San Marcos Unified School District be able to support not only purchasing land, developing a school, and maintaining another school both infrastructure costs and administration when the San Marcos City council or any other municipality in the district approves more home development? This isn’t just a build more schools to match the development problem. How can a district support these schools caused by the excessive development

approved solely by the cities that reside in the district? Where will the San Marcos Unified School District obtain revenue to support the educational demands due to the increased student population? Do we just pay more taxes to stop gap the imbalance and shortsighted rapid development without looking into sustainable growth and support for our district? This is obviously a big picture problem that affects the overall quality of life in San Marcos and needs to be addressed.

What will your role be to align two very separate structured government entities for smart growth and educational excellence? Where will the balance be sustained so that development approval supports the schools to enhance the city? What rules and regulations will you seek to reform to support this vision?

Alexis Barbuto
Voter and Mother of 3 students in the San Marcos Unified School District



Wayne Ludwig and his wife Cindy have lived in the San Elijo Hills area of San Marcos since 2002, both working for the Department of the Navy. Wayne currently serves the Navy Region Southwest (NRSW) Region Safety and Health Program Director, providing myriad opportunities to serve the interests of federal, state and local government personnel and taxpayers.

Wayne is running for a seat on the Vallecitos Water Board, Division 5 this November. His 33 years working for the Department of the Defense and Department of Navy have led to an extensive amount of training and education in many disciplines and areas of Public Works operations.

If elected, Wayne’s intentions are to unify the Water Board, provide proactive leadership and reestablish trust and accountability to the board, Vallecitos employees and all rate payers. His plan is to arrest all favoritism, bias and unfair practices that currently plague the board and rate payers. “I am running for election because as a rate payer, and given the present fractious nature of the Board, there are myriad problems I can help fix,” he stated. “Furthermore, the present Board has granted unnecessary and very questionable favors to developers, which only serve to degrade and diminish the future of the Vallecitos Water District.”

You can find out more by visiting his website at or via email at

*San Elijo Life Editors note-This is not an endorsement and we welcome campaign statements from all candidates.

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