Tag Archives: City Council

San Marcos City Council Approves Massive Development Plan – NBC 7 San Diego

San Marcos City Council Approves Massive Development Plan Some residents are concerned it’s too much change while others are looking forward to new housing options

San Marcos is moving forward with a massive development project, but not without a little bit of pushback from the community. Tuesday, the City Council voted in favor to develop a desirable 87-acre parcel just west of Cal State San Marcos and east of the San Marcos Creek.

READ MORE VIA Source: San Marcos City Council Approves Massive Development Plan – NBC 7 San Diego

San Marcos residents fighting to block development by referendum – The San Diego Union-Tribune

San Marcos residents opposed to a 220-home development on Twin Oaks Valley Road have collected signatures for a referendum against the project.Residents gathered 5,000 signatures for a ballot measure to overturn City Council approval of the Brookfield development in San Marcos. Residents opposed say the development will worsen traffic and school overcrowding. Officials who support the project say it offers entry-level housing. Residents who fear a planned development will create problems for roads, schools and safety in San Marcos are trying to take the project to voters in November, in hopes of reversing the City Council’s approval.

READ MORE FROM Source: San Marcos residents fighting to block development by referendum – The San Diego Union-Tribune

Eric Flodine for San Marcos City Council

San Marcos Planning Commissioner Eric Flodine today announced his campaign for City Council.  Flodine has served on the City Planning Commission for 6 years including 4 years as Chairman.  Prior to this, he served 2 years on the City General Plan Advisory Committee.

Starting in November 2018, the City of San Marcos will begin electing Council Members by district.  District 2 includes: San Elijo Hills, Old Creek Ranch, Discovery Hills, Rancho Dorado, Laurels, Palomar Estates and the adjoining neighborhoods.  Flodine has been a resident of District 2 for over 10 years, and looks forward to representing the interests of residents and businesses within this area and citywide.

According to Flodine: “San Marcos is a great community to call home. We are blessed to be the education and recreation hub of North County, and this is the result of the dedication of past councils, City staff, educational leaders, teachers, business leaders and active residents.  We have experienced an extraordinary growth rate over the last 20 years.  With this growth, we have experienced growing pains.

With my education and career as a community planner, I always tell my kids, “Start with the end in mind and work backwards”.  Unfortunately, I have seen too many recent Council decisions being made in a reactionary way.  This has resulted in understandable frustration by our City’s residents.  I will work with City Staff and other stakeholder agencies to adopt forward thinking, measurable policies that will strengthen our future City decisions.

I will bring PROACTIVE LEADERSHIP to the City Council as our City continues to mature, looking ahead to the next 5, 10 and 20 years. 

My plan to make San Marcos the leading community of North County is called C.I.T.Y. and combined with resident and business input will guide my future decisions on the City Council.” 

Visit the Flodine campaign website at www.Flodine2018.us

Father and son reach ‘term limits’ on council and high school hoops – The Coast News Group

SAN MARCOS — Chris Orlando and his son, Ryan, are at a crossroads that few father-and-son duos face together.Call it ‘term limits’ — figuratively and literally. Chris Orlando is a San Marcos City Councilman in the final year of his last four-year term of office. Ryan Orlando, 18, is a standout basketball player at San Marcos High School, playing his final high school basketball season. Both are plotting their next steps. For Chris Orlando, the next step could be a run — for mayor, that is. For Ryan Orlando, it could be a walk — as in “walk-on,” the term for a nonscholarship member of a collegiate basketball team.But both of them are enjoying going through the transition together.“It’s really interesting, as I am considering my next step and watching him do that, the realization that we’re both figuring out what the next chapter is, is kind of cool,” Chris Orlando said. “My son has a strict ‘no pep talk’ policy, so we keep the pep talks to a minimum, but it is neat we are at a new chapter at the same time. It’s been good.”The Orlandos’ respective political and athletic journeys have virtually paralleled each other. The elder was elected in 2006, around the time that the younger first picked up a basketball.

READ MORE – Source: Father and son reach ‘term limits’ on council and high school hoops – The Coast News Group

Report: San Marcos’ Gaining Steam in Key Economic, Education Areas

Housing and business stock are on the rise, and there’s still plenty of potential for growth

In recent years, San Marcos has seen household incomes grow and the already low unemployment rate fall. At the same time, the city is home to high-paying industries and universities that are a pipeline for regional talent.

Those are among the takeaways of a recently released City of San Marcos Regional Profile, which demonstrates with comprehensive data sets the city’s momentum in key economic and education areas.

The city commissioned the regional profile, produced by the San Diego Regional Economic Development Corporation (San Diego Regional EDC), to gain insight and information to be used on future economic development efforts, a major priority for the city.

The regional profile encompasses four sections: demographics, socioeconomics, the housing market and the economy, with major findings that include:

  • Household income grew by 8.9 percent each year from 2011 to 2015, greatly outpacing the region’s rate of 1.4 percent;
  • The unemployment rate of 2.9 percent continues to be low, and historical unemployment data show the city weathered the Great Recession better than the region, state and nation;
  • San Marcos boasts 4,000 businesses, up 10 percent from a decade ago. Local firms’ resiliency in the face of the Great Recession has been a key to San Marcos’ status as an economic powerhouse;
  • As North County’s education hub, San Marcos produces 10 percent of the San Diego region’s total academic program completions, with the lion’s share coming from Cal State San Marcos and Palomar College;
  • Higher-than-average median wages can be found in three high-paying industries: manufacturing, wholesale trade and information; and
  • Between 2010 and 2015 housing stock grew by 10.1 percent—San Marcos has more opportunities for development than other regional cities.

“The numbers in the regional profile tell the story: San Marcos’ growing reputation as a great place to live, work and play is well deserved. Not only do we have 40,000 jobs, an annual GDP totaling $7.9 billion and stellar educational institutions, but the community also boasts 72 miles of multi-use trails, 300 acres of park space, 240 restaurants and eight breweries,” said Economic Development Manager Tess Radmill.

As for the work piece of that trio, the City bolstered its business-friendly reputation through proactive economic development, which in 2012 the City Council prioritized in response to the tough economy and the end of redevelopment funding. City efforts thus far have included cutting red tape from the development approval process and there is recognition that there is room for more improvement.

Also part of this commitment to improving business is the regional profile itself, the City’s first such snapshot that will shape future economic development initiatives.

“This profile provides clarity and insight into San Marcos’ regional strengths, in addition to identifying the fundamental drivers of the local economy,” said Kirby Brady, the San Diego Regional EDC’s Director of Research. “It is clear that the city is an economic powerhouse with a diverse economic base, a highly-educated and talented workforce, and opportunities for growth.”

To review the full regional profile, visit www.san-marcos.net/regionalprofile.

City of San Marcos Boosting Its Economic Development Efforts

From tax-credit education to an easier permitting process, the city is striving to do business better

When it comes to economic development, the City of San Marcos is raising the bar and local businesses are taking note—like Cliniqa, a bio-techne company that just went through an expansion.

“What can be a lengthy permit process was made easier by the wonderful employees in the Planning, Fire and Building departments,” said Lisa Profeta, Facilities Manager at Cliniqa in San Marcos.

The city has always embraced entrepreneurship because it drives a high quality of life—but it took center stage in 2012 when the State ended redevelopment programming, which took a toll on local business growth. Coupled with the recession, San Marcos saw a need to be more proactive in its economic development.

“City Council quickly realized we needed to focus our energy there if we wanted to remain a thriving, leading city,” said City Manager Jack Griffin. “Given that, City Council created a vision for a more business-friendly San Marcos.”

That vision began to take shape in 2015, when the city’s first economic development division was created. Since then, significant progress has been made, including the hire of an economic development manager and the launch of the San Marcos Business Walk Program, a twice-a-year event where volunteers collect feedback about the challenges facing local commerce.

Staff has also worked to cut a lot of red tape from the development approval process—everything from making it easier to navigate the land entitlement process, to bolstering city and private sector collaboration on California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) document preparation, to a City of San Marcos and Building Industry Association (BIA) pilot project  that is under development to allow for digital submission of project plans to save money on construction document printing costs, which can run $20,000 to $70,000 per on a typical subdivision during the entirety of the development approval process.”

“The city Development Services team, particularly Planning staff, are constantly working with the city’s Economic Development Manager to understand the needs of existing and prospective businesses,” said  Director of Development Services Dahvia Lynch. “Planning and Economic Development go hand in hand and our collaboration is crucial to our improvements, which are a work in progress.”

In fact, staff still sees plenty of room for improvements. For example, they are working to give business owners more opportunities to save time or money by streamlining and more clearly defining permitting process. There are also plans to standardize more reference materials for the permitting process, and to make more resources available online for business owners.

“Ideally, we would love to empower more business owners with the knowledge and resources they need,” Lynch said.

In that vein, city staff has also started to educate business owners about any benefits that they may qualify for. For example, Wholesale Shade was awarded a $500,000 California Competes Tax Credit, which Founder and CEO Patrick Howe learned about through the bi-monthly Council Business Visits. As part of the credit, the company intends to create 26 jobs over the next five years.

Likewise, the Council Business Visits, also led Cliniqa to apply, resulting in a $350,000 California Competes Tax Credit, with which the company plans to use to create 24 jobs over the next five years. Economic Development Manager Tess Radmill and the San Diego Regional Economic Development Corporation worked closely with the two companies—along with other San Marcos businesses that hope to receive the credit in the future—to simplify the application process.

“Most business owners I know are focused on the daily challenges of keeping their doors open and are not experts at regulations or government programs,” Howe explained. “Knowing that the City of San Marcos is a partner in the success of our business is reassuring.”

Radmill says that’s precisely how she hopes the business community views the city: a partner in their success.

“We’re working to ensure our local businesses are empowered to reach their full potential because their success is part of what drives the high quality of life we all enjoy here in San Marcos.”

To learn more about the city’s economic development efforts, contact Economic Development Manager Tess Radmill at tradmill@san-marcos.net.

Last Call: Residents encouraged to apply for various San Marcos City commissions and committees

City of San Marcos officials are encouraging residents to get involved and make a difference in their community by applying for open positions on the Community Services Commission, Planning Commission, San Marcos Community Foundation, Traffic Commission and San Marcos Creek Specific Plan Oversight Commission.

The deadline to apply for each of these openings is Friday, Dec. 16 at 5:30 pm. Appointments will be made after public interviews are conducted by the City Council during its regular meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 10 at 6 pm. Candidates should be prepared to provide a brief presentation discussing their background and qualifications for the desired position.

Detailed eligibility requirements, application instructions and interview requirements are available online at www.san-marcos.net/commissions or by visiting 1 Civic Center Drive.

Two positions are open on city’s Community Services Commission, which has the responsibility of advising the City Council in matters pertaining to the creation, operation, maintenance, management and control of the community recreation programs, of playgrounds and indoor and outdoor recreation, activities, and facilities.

The Planning Commission has four openings for individuals interested in evaluating and making decisions on a variety of land use matters for both long-range and short-range planning within the City of San Marcos. The commission conducts public hearings on significant planning, zoning and land subdivision matters such as specific plans, subdivision maps, conditional use permits and rezones; and handling any other matters as required by the municipal code.

Four positions are open on the San Marcos Community Foundation, which serves to enrich the quality of life for the community of San Marcos by serving as a nonprofit public benefit corporation providing grants to other nonprofit organizations that assist the city or its residents.

The Traffic Commission has three vacancies for residents looking to seek ways to improve traffic conditions, operations and safety, and the administration of enforcement of traffic regulations.

Finally, eight positions are open on the San Marcos Creek Specific Plan Oversight Committee. This body was created for the purpose of monitoring the implementation of the San Marcos Creek Specific Plan as well as conducting a formal progress report on the San Marcos Creek Specific Plan

For more information about applying for a vacancy, please contact the San Marcos City Clerk at (760) 744-1050, ext. 3145 or cityclerk@san-marcos.net.

For more information about the city’s commissions, please visit www.san-marcos.net.

San Marcos OK’s 189-home project – The San Diego Union-Tribune

Highlands Project

Highlands Project

A controversial bid to build 189 houses in the foothills of northern San Marcos won approval this week from the San Marcos City Council, but critics have vowed to keep fighting the project, saying it’s too much development for the untouched land. The so-called San Marcos Highlands community — approved by the council in a 4-1 vote Tuesday —  is planned for a nearly 300-acre property at the northern end of Las Posas Road. Homes would be built on 50 acres, and the rest of the property would be set aside as permanent open space. About half the land is within the city limits and the other half is in the county’s unincorporated area.

READ MORE VIA Source: San Marcos OK’s 189-home project – The San Diego Union-Tribune

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