Tag Archives: Tess Radmill

New Data: San Marcos Manufacturing is Booming

New Data: San Marcos Manufacturing is Booming

The industry is the city’s second-largest economic sector

San Marcos is home to a bustling manufacturing industry, and though most of us never actually see it, recent findings reveal just how much business is booming in the city’s industrial parks.

Manufacturing is the city’s second-largest economic sector, accounting for nearly 7 percent of local gross domestic product (GDP), or about $5M annually—and providing 11 percent of the city’s employment, which is about 4,300 jobs, according to research by the San Diego Regional Economic Development Corporation (San Diego Regional EDC).

What’s more, the median income for manufacturing jobs in San Marcos is about $70,000, which is nearly $15,000 higher than the rest of the region, state and nation. That’s thanks to a cluster of high-tech companies that make medical devices and information technology instruments.

“San Marcos is fortunate to have a manufacturing industry that attracts top talent and is a major contributor to our city’s economy,” said Economic Development Manager Tess Radmill.

Of course, this begs the question: What has attracted these manufacturers to San Marcos? And what is keeping them here?

The answer largely boils down to ample industrial space, and increasingly, a more collaborative relationship with the growing city.

For example, Hunter Industries, a global leader in irrigation, was launched in San Marcos 36 years ago and is now the city’s largest private employer. As the company has expanded, the city  has been able to accommodate its headquarters, which now spans 20 acres and 11 buildings.

“We don’t have to pick up and move miles away as we grow,” explained Scotty Lombardi, Hunter Industries Senior Manager of Global Talent Management. “In fact, we’re about to break ground on another empty lot in our business park.”

The company also has 1 billion square-feet of manufacturing space across the world, but it’s managed to keep about 30 percent here in San Marcos. But beyond space, Lombardi says Hunter Industries has appreciated more outreach from the city in recent years.

“We are now much more aware of what’s happening in the city around us,” he said. “San Marcos has made it clear they’re a business partner and that makes us want to stay.”

That mix of industrial inventory and a business-friendly government is not only keeping longstanding companies put but is also attracting new manufacturers—particularly in the rising wave of craft beer and spirits.

The city already has nearly a dozen distilleries and breweries, which will soon include Raging Cider & Mead Co, slated to open next month.

“San Marcos is a great location for us because it has breweries, taphouses and pubs that cater to a public looking for new experiences in the world of craft beverages,” said David Carr, President of Raging Cider & Mead Co.

And though this venture is part of an emerging scene, Carr himself is no stranger to the San Marcos manufacturing industry. In fact, for the past 17 years San Marcos has been home to his other manufacturing company, Crown Steel, which specializes in custom stainless steel fabrication and restaurant equipment.

Carr now plans to run both manufacturing companies out of his 20,000 square-foot industrial space. As a longtime local entrepreneur, Carr says working with other manufacturers is one of the things he enjoys most about being in San Marcos.

“We have discovered many other manufacturers in San Marcos who either provide services we need or have use of services we offer, and that’s been very good for our business,” he said.

Collectively, all that manufacturing activity in San Marcos is helping the San Diego region keep its footing as an industry hub, which includes more than 3,000 companies supporting more than 105,000 jobs, according the to San Diego Regional EDC.

In that vein, the upcoming Manufacturing Day, a national series of events that aims to celebrate the industry, is slated for the first week of October and locally, there in an event that will include San Marcos.

On Wednesday, October 4, MiraCosta Community College will host North County Manufacturing Day, which will feature a networking event and a resource fair. For more information, you can visit https://www.mfgday.com/events/2017/miracosta-technology-career-institute.

“Events like these are important because they shine a light on an often unseen yet important industry for the regional economy—and San Marcos is proud to be a driving force behind that,” Radmill said.

To learn more about the city’s economic development efforts, contact Economic Development Manager Tess Radmill at tradmill@san-marcos.net.

San Marcos and CSUSM join forces to benefit the community

San Marcos and CSUSM join forces to benefit the community

As North County’s education hub, San Marcos is building tomorrow’s workforce—and thanks to a new initiative, some of that homegrown talent is being channeled to help city staff better serve the community.

The City and Cal State San Marcos (CSUSM) recently joined forces to launch Democracy in Action, a pilot program that lets students spend a semester working on city projects.

“Some of the region’s brightest minds are on that campus, right down the street from City Hall, so this partnership felt like a natural win win,” said Economic Development Manager Tess Radmill, who helped oversee the effort.

Over the past few months, about 100 students tackled projects that included: finding ways to curb unnecessary 911 calls; developing a marketing plan for the Double Peak Challenge race; analyzing data to help reduce stormwater pollution; and creating a promotional video about the city.

Already, the project has delivered tangible benefits. For example, students created a trash collection map that will help staff meet new environmental state guidelines. And the video produced by students is already being used to attract potential businesses and residents.

“We’re also graduating students who leave with a deeper understanding of a how a local community works—and with that, they can influence outcomes down the road,” explains Scott Gross, CSUSM Associate Vice President of Community Partnership Engagement.

Fostering civic minded graduates is especially important to the region because many stay local after graduation. In fact, about 80 percent of CSUSM alumni continue living in the region. By comparison, about 60 percent of San Diego State University (SDSU) alumni stay local—and the same is true for only about 25 percent of University of California San Diego (UCSD) alumni.

Democracy in Action was inspired by the University of Oregon’s Sustainable City Year Program— which works in largely the same way, but focuses on boosting sustainability. CSUSM liked the concept, but felt it was important to focus instead on civic engagement.

“We wanted students to realize they can inform and impact their local government,” Gross said. “They’re not just sitting in a classroom talking about theories—they’re actually putting their knowledge to work in a meaningful way, and their eyes light up.”

CSUSM student Kristina Kalchev is a testament to that.

“It was great working on a project that extends beyond an assignment and impacts people,” said Kalchev, who worked on the city’s promotional video. “I’m proud to include the video in my reel. I don’t feel so fresh out of the water now. I feel ready for the workforce.”

Kalchev plans to stay in San Marcos and earn her graduate degree while working locally. She says as a San Marcos resident, she now has a deeper appreciation for what the city does.

“We were able to see how much city staff does behind the scenes to keep our community safe. The project really opened my eyes to what local government does,” she said.

Storm Water Program Manager Reed Thornberry also saw a ha moments happening when he took students out into the field.

“I wanted to take them beyond the data. A lot them live in San Marcos—some have even grown up here—but they’ve never explored our creek system,” he said. “They spotted bullfrogs, turtles and crawfish—entire ecosystems thriving. And seeing the impacts of trash, they got a sense of why they’re worth protecting. I think that drove home the mission.”

These students will be among the approximately 3,000 graduates CSUSM produces every year— which is partly why San Marcos is North County’s education hub. In fact, San Marcos is responsible for about 10 percent of the region’s total academic program completions.

“San Marcos is fueling a workforce pipeline that will strengthen our region for generations to come,” said San Marcos City Manager Jack Griffin. “But beyond that, our partnership with Cal State San Marcos underscores how we can collaborate to benefit our community, and we are proud of that.”

To learn more about the Democracy in Action program,
visit https://www.csusm.edu/community/civiclearning/democracyinaction.html.

San Marcos names Economic Development Manager

San Marcos names Economic Development Manager

San Marcos names Economic Development Manager

San Marcos, CA— Tess Radmill, former Executive Director of Cardiff 101 Main Street, has been tapped to serve as Economic Development Manager for the City of San Marcos.

“We searched far and wide for the right person to step into this important role,” said City Manager Jack Griffin. “In Ms. Radmill, I believe we’ve found someone that understands the San Marcos vision –economic development that is good for our residents and good for our economy—and has the talent and skill set to help get us there by building a program from the ground up.”

Stepping into the new role Aug. 31, Radmill said she is ready to get to work in one of North County’s fastest growing cities.
“San Marcos has truly been innovative and embraces an entrepreneurial spirit that is unique,” said Radmill. “I am excited to be a part of the many upcoming projects that will shape the San Marcos community for years to come.”

As Economic Development Manager, Radmill will have a key role in attracting and retaining businesses in San Marcos. She is also charged with developing and managing an economic development program that aligns with city goals while capitalizing on the city’s partnership with the Innovate 78 initiative. Innovate 78 is a collaborative effort between the five 78 Corridor cities–San Marcos, Carlsbad, Vista, Escondido and Oceanside—that is focused on boosting economic prosperity in North County.
“I’m eager to hit the ground running and look forward to collaborating with and learning from the other Innovate 78 cities,” continued Radmill. “One of my first priorities will be to meet with San Marcos businesses to learn their goals and how the city can better support them.”

For the past seven years, Radmill has served as the Executive Director for the Cardiff 101 Main Street Association, a nonprofit that works with local government and business owners to improve the community’s overall quality of life.

Under her leadership, the Encinitas nonprofit grew from its grassroots infancy to a state-certified Main Street organization. By building strong partnerships with local business and community leaders, Radmill was able to grow the program to include two full-time staff members and an annual operating budget of $250,000. She also helped the City of Encinitas develop its economic development efforts as part of a steering committee, lending her expertise and guidance to city staff.

“I am proud of Cardiff 101 Main Street and my experiences there have given me a unique understanding for what it takes to successfully develop and nurture economic prosperity,” said Radmill.

Born and raised in North County, Radmill holds a bachelor of arts from Claremont McKenna College. She is also a recent graduate of Cal State San Marcos’ Leadership North County, a program that connects local leaders so they can work collaboratively to build a stronger region.